Who's ready for a Harvey? The Climate Minute Podcast

For part two of our Hurricane Harvey coverage, we explore the aftermath and future of this and other “climate-assisted catastrophes.”  We probe how Boston would fare in the face of a similar hurricane, and how the country as a whole could function if catastrophes like Hurricane Harvey occurred regularly.

Read more

A Climate Assisted Catastrophe: The Climate Minute Podcast

Of course, our focus is on Houston, Texas and the devastation incurred from Hurricane Harvey. Due to the enormity of the event, we will cover this topic in two podcast sessions—this week we focus on the human scale of the suffering, what you can do to help, the climate change assist given to this storm, and the implications of what is happening. We state, unequivocally, that Hurricane Harvey and its destructive nature is the sort of extreme weather event that climate scientists have warned about for decades.

Read more

100% Renewables Now! The Climate Minute Podcast

Bill McKibben makes a clear declaration in his new article on how we can get to a sustainable future:

It’s the call for the rapid conversion of energy systems around the country to 100 percent renewable power—a call for running the United States (and the world) on sun, wind and water. What Medicare for All is to the healthcare debate, or Fight for $15 is to the battle against inequality, 100% Renewable is to the struggle for the planet’s future. It’s how progressives will think about energy going forward—and though it started in northern Europe and Northern California, it’s a call that’s gaining traction outside the obvious green enclaves.  

Listen in as we discuss!

Read more

Winter is coming: The Climate Minute Podcast

It seemed that fact was stranger than fiction in our discussion. We covered the climate implications of the solar eclipse, Geoffrey Supran and Naomi Oreskes’ new paper about ExxonMobil’s climate change communications, and Game of Throne’s “CliFi” subtext.

Read more

The Baker Plan on the Climate Minute Podcast

First, we give pause to stand in solidarity with the people of Charlottesville, VA and to take a moment to honor the life and sacrifice of Heather Heyer.

With guest host Regina McIntyre, we investigate Baker’s true climate motives, which are heroic in comparison to the clandestine efforts to sabotage the EPA that Scott Pruitt is undertaking. We salute a conservative Texas Mayor whose city runs on renewables. Tune in for those details.

Read more

Is Biomass right for MA? The Climate Minute Podcast

Here in Massachusetts we consider ourselves leaders in the climate change movement. Notable among our many efforts on clean energy is the Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA), started in 2008. One of the items in the GWSA is a mandate to get to a certain amount of clean energy by the year 2020. As part of that effort to get to the mandated amount of clean energy that we use in MA, an idea has come up to burn biomass—essentially wood—and put it into the “clean energy” category. According to an article in the Boston Globe, the Baker Administration is considering designating biomass for renewable energy and making biomass eligible for clean energy incentives, which is very controversial as you might imagine. The Baker Administration is saying that biomass is part of the so-called “combo platter” of energy that the state needs to rely on and that over time it should not increase carbon emissions. Climate hawks protest because burning biomass will create more pollution in the form of soot and also reduce the trees that are needed to absorb carbon dioxide. As D.R. says, looking at it from a 35,000 foot perspective, branding biomass to be renewable energy as though it is the equivalent of wind and solar reminds him of the famous Reagan initiative to brand ketchup as a vegetable. This is an opportunity to play semantics with what is considered “renewable” and “clean energy.”

Read more

One thousand ninety five and three quarter days: The Climate Minute Podcast

Amidst the environmental turmoil of the current administration, the Washington Post tells us we have three years left to act on climate before it is too late; in the meantime, the Supreme Judicial Court prepares to hear Exxon/Mobil’s appeal against Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey and Massachusetts utilities try to move us backward while Vermont moves forward on renewables. Tune in for more.

Read more

Every Polluter's Ally: The Climate Minute Podcast

This week we drown in the sorrowful organization that used to be the Environmental Protection Agency (and is now Every Polluters Ally).

Read more

Congressman Lamar Smith on the- wait for it- "often ignored and under-researched" benefits of climate change: The Climate Minute Podcast

Lamar Smith (R-Texas) and Exxon/Mobil receive the brunt of our climate ire this week,  while Al Gore’s indefatigable optimism and his new movie An Inconvenient Sequel bring us hope.

Read more

When HONESTy isn't the best policy: The Climate Minute Podcast

Our focus today is the HONEST act (a.k.a the disHONEST act) and Scott Pruitt – the invisible leader of the EPA. Guest host Regina McIntyre guided us through the climate news this week. Lamar Smith (R-Texas) introduced a bill called the Honest and Open New EPA Science Treatment (HONEST) Act. This is a misleading piece of legislation that has made its way through the House of Representatives and is now being considered in the Senate.

Read more


Donate Volunteer MCAN in the Media

connect

get updates